Located on the east coast of Ireland and capital of the country, Dublin is a human-sized city where it is pleasant to stroll. An authentic and absolutely charming metropolis, you will discover a very interesting architectural heritage and lively districts. How indeed how to pass by the famous pubs and their lively atmosphere in the evening. Not forgetting of course its museums, which make it a destination of choice for art and culture lovers. Dublin is the perfect city to spend a weekend of festive, cultural and exoticism, and a must for anyone who wants to discover Ireland and its specificities. In Europe, there are a huge number of cities offering flights to Dublin, so there is no reason to miss out on this unique destination, and here are the must-sees

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Getting to Trinity College

Trinity College is the oldest university in Ireland and is free to attend. Founded in 1592, you can admire the buildings and the courtyard where many statues are placed. But if there is one place that attracts all the curious once inside, it is its incredible library, a place absolutely out of time. Walking along the central aisle, which is more than 60 metres long, you will discover shelves with millions of books as far as the eye can see, in a wooded setting and under a vaulted ceiling. While there is a charge for admission to the library, the place is worth it for the feeling of being in the middle of a film and also for a visit to the indispensable 1,200-year-old Book of Kells.

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A visit to the Guinness Storehouse

You can't get to Dublin without visiting the brewery that makes Ireland's most famous beverage: Guinness. In a place with seven levels, you can learn more about the history of this dark beer with a unique taste and famous all over the world. After discovering the secrets of making the drink, we go to the Gravity Bar for a tasting session and also to enjoy a sublime Panorama of Dublin. Whether you like beer or not, the Guinness Storehouse is a must-see and attracts thousands of visitors every year.

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A stroll through the National Gallery of Ireland

The National Gallery of Ireland was opened in 1864. The museum is located in Merrion Square and has had to be expanded over the course of its history as the richness of its collection continued to grow. In the 54 rooms of the museum there are over 800 works of art from the Middle Ages to the 20th century from Western Europe. They are arranged in historical, geographical and chronological order. Among the artists whose works can be found on the various floors are Monet, Caravaggio, Picasso, Moya and Van Gogh.

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Visit St Patrick's Cathedral

St Patrick's Cathedral is the largest church in the country and was built in the 12th century in honour of Ireland's patron saint. It has had a tumultuous history, having suffered several fires, abandonments and desecrations, but it has always been rebuilt and restored to show its present face. After taking the time to tour its exterior architecture, one must take the time to go inside to see its plaques, busts, stained glass windows and nave. It is a wonderful testimony to medieval Dublin and a great place to stroll in the adjoining alleys, which are lined with green lawns.

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A discovery of the Temple Bar district

Dublin is home to vibrant neighbourhoods, making it a favourite destination for travellers who like to get out and party. The Temple Bar area is certainly the liveliest in Dublin! It is here that one takes the time to wander through the winding cobbled streets that reveal a special charm after dark. Among the places to discover are art galleries, exhibition centres and restaurants where you should stop to recharge your batteries. In the evening, you don't hesitate for a second to enter a pub, order a good beer and simply have a good time

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A picnic at St Stephen's Green

St Stephen's Green is Dublin's largest park, a green lung that appeals to locals and visitors alike. It provides a moment's escape from the hustle and bustle of the city centre and a peaceful place to enjoy a picnic. The place is particularly pleasant as soon as the good weather returns. It is located near Grafton Street and there are pools, fountains, playgrounds for children, waterfalls, in clear, everything you need to spend a quiet moment with family or friends in a green and bucolic setting

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A tour of Kilmainham Goal Prison

For an unusual visit to Dublin, it is advisable to head for Kilmainham Goal Prison. Opened in 1796, it has housed some of the most prominent historical figures and leaders of the rebellion within its walls. The conditions of detention there were particularly difficult, with unheated, windowless cells. This made it one of the most terrible prisons in Europe. Today, it is closed and no longer holds prisoners. It is, however, a museum open to the public, where the difficult living conditions of the former inmates can be discovered. A moving and shivering moment. A guide is available to tell the most precious secrets about the prison.

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Marvel at Dublin Castle

Dublin Castle is a magnificent 13th century building in the city centre. Do not miss the chance to take a closer look at the Record Tower, the oldest remains dating back to 1258. As far as the rest of the monument is concerned, the architecture has evolved over the course of history towards a neoclassical style. Once inside, one of the most beautiful rooms is the Throne Room, the place where kings received their guests from their throne. The overall architecture of the building is fantastic, with a variety of styles, and the place still hosts great personalities and political ceremonies today.

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Admire the Christ Church Cathedral

Lovers of religious architecture cannot fail to admire another superb building in the centre of the Irish capital, the Christ Church Cathedral. Founded around 1028, it is one of the most important sanctuaries in the country. Inside there is a 12th century crypt which is none other than the oldest structure in the city. It houses surprising inhabitants: a mummified cat and a mummified rat! Another amazing part is the small bridge that can be discovered from outside and that connects the cathedral and Synod Hall, a museum dedicated to the Vikings and the Irish Middle Ages

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A cultural moment at the Irish Museum of Modern Art

In this free museum, visitors discover a rich collection of contemporary artworks. The site, which opened in 1991 in the former Royal Hospital in Kilmainham, houses mainly the creations of Irish artists, most of whom are still alive. The idea here is to present works that are off the beaten track, including paintings, sculptures and surprising and innovative installations. The museum has a permanent exhibition, but also organises temporary exhibitions. There is also a shop and a coffee shop to end the visit with a gourmet break

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