Petit Futé
English
  • Français
  • English
  • Español
Results Mémorial Aix-En-Provence

Petit Futé's opinion on SITE MÉMORIAL DU CAMP DES MILLES

Plate millesim 2022

The only major French internment and deportation camp still intact today, the Les Milles camp has been an innovative and unique museum of history and human sciences in France since 2012, a place for history and reflection. It is a historical heritage in two ways: before becoming an internment camp, it was a tile factory in 1882 that participated in the industrial development of the region and whose activity resumed after the war in 1947, only to cease in 2006

. It is for the events that took place there during the Second World War that this place absolutely deserves a visit. From 1939, a tragic story in three parts unfolds between the brick walls of this disused factory. Closed and abandoned because of the economic recession, the tile factory was requisitioned by the Third Republic, which decided to lock up citizens from enemy countries living on the national territory. The vast majority of those interned in the camp were Germans and Austrians, intellectuals, scientists, writers, journalists and politicians. Proof of the great confusion and xenophobic climate of the time, most of these men were anti-fascists who had fled Hitler's anti-Semitic policies. Among the internees were also many artists, some of whom were internationally renowned (Max Ernst, Hans Bellmer). They left a trace of their passage with the creation of works of art that can still be admired today on the camp walls.

In 1940, after the defeat of France against Germany, the country was cut in two. The area that was not occupied by the Germans was run by the Vichy government, which reused the place and turned it into a transit camp, where more than thirty nationalities lived side by side in extremely difficult conditions. Thousands of people, considered undesirable, came to overcrowd the camp and Pétain wanted to expel them. Some of them were trying to reach the port of Marseille in order to take a boat to the United States, and they still hoped to leave the camp and France one day.

In 1942, Pétain agreed to hand over to the Nazis the Jews presented as "foreigners" living in the non-occupied zone. The Milles camp became a deportation camp and a cog in the Nazi death machine. It was the tragic outcome of a process that had begun three years earlier. Not only did Pétain agree to the deportation of the Jewish population considered to be foreigners living on the territory, but his anti-Semitic zeal also led him to propose, without being asked, to hand over the Jewish children. The deportees were called into the courtyard, some trying, in a last desperate gesture, to escape their tragic fate. In August and September 1942, the deportations followed one another at the Milles camp. In total, 2,000 Jewish men, women and children were transferred to the Drancy camp and then sent to Auschwitz, where a certain death awaited them. The Vichy government was complicit in the Shoah by handing over these innocent people to those who would become their executioners.

The camp of Les Milles is today a place of memory open to the public, which can be visited with great emotion as the atmosphere seems unchanged. The exhibition is divided into three parts. The first is devoted to the history of the site and helps to better understand the particular period in which these tragic events took place. It presents the collective history of the camp by illustrating it with individual destinies, and proposes to discover the context that led to the rise of perils in Europe and to deepen the themes of the Vichy regime, the Shoah, anti-Semitism, etc. The second part of the exhibition is devoted to a visit to the internment camp. On three levels, the discovery of the main buildings of the tile factory gives an overview of what the internees experienced. Testimonies, videos and documents complete the visit and help to imagine the difficult daily life of these men and women. We discover, intact, the traces they left of their passage, in particular the paintings that cover the walls of the guards' refectory. The third part proposes a section focused on reflection, in an attempt to understand the human mechanisms of horror and the mechanisms that can lead to a mass crime, in the context of the Second World War but also of the Armenian and Rwandan genocides, and especially in today's society. Pedagogical, this part of the exhibition questions our individual and collective functioning and questions our consciences. How can we learn from the past in the face of rising intolerance and extremism to avoid history repeating itself? What are the possible resistances? Finally, the museum hosts a national exhibition dedicated to Jewish children deported from France, created by Serge Klarsfeld. The visit ends with a walk along the Chemin des Déportés, which leads to a memorial car installed where the departures to Auschwitz took place.

The Memorial-Site is a place of remembrance and education for citizenship, with an interactive and educational museographic tour, workshops and conferences, a museum for the whole family.

3.9/5 (16 notice)
Share on

Information on SITE MÉMORIAL DU CAMP DES MILLES

Open every day from 10am to 7pm. Closed of the ticket office at 6pm. Closed on January 1st, May 1st and December 25th. Possibility of visit of group. Duration of visit: approximately 2.30am. Free for under 9-year-olds. Adult: €9.50. Reduced: €7.50. Free access of part of the site (Exhibitions Serge Klarsfeld and the Work of Help of the children, Room of Paintings, Chemin des Déportés and Wagon of the Souvenir). Audioguides multilingual. Lifts. Loan of wheel chairs subject to availability. Children welcome (adapted course). Guided tour (ask for information with the home page). Catering facilities. Bookstore. Cultural events.

Services offered by SITE MÉMORIAL DU CAMP DES MILLES

  • Wheelchair accessible
  • Accessible to people with reduced mobility
  • Bikers

Video SITE MÉMORIAL DU CAMP DES MILLES

Members' reviews on SITE MÉMORIAL DU CAMP DES MILLES

16 reviews
3.9/5
Value for money
Service
Originality
pfute_16366465764197
3/5
Visited in november 2021
Value for money
Service
Originality
Accueil inapproprié !
Nous regrettons l'intolérance et le manque de compréhension de la personne de l'accueil qui nous a refusé l'entrée sous le prétexte que seul l'un de nos enfants âgé de 13 ans ne disposait pas de son QR code : "ce sont les ordres de ma direction et je ne peux y déroger" . Bien étrange comportement inévitablement associé à celui des "bons citoyens" du triste régime pétainiste; Sans compter qu'il n'y avait pas un chat dans le mémorial ce jour-là à l'heure du déjeuner le jeudi 11 novembre et que l'espace est extrêmement vaste à l'opposé d'un lieu confiné. Déçus par ce manque d'humanité indigne d'un tel lieu, nous avons amèrement repris la route (200 km !) en expliquant à nos enfants que tout ordre ne doit pas forcément bon à être exécuté "à la lettre "mais en son âme et conscience. Merci à Madame de l'accueil et à sa Direction d'y songer..
B.B (fièrement petit fis de résistant)
Lye
5/5
Visited in may 2019
Value for money
Service
Originality
Un lieu très intéressant sur un sujet peu abordé, les camps d'internement (ayant moi-même travaillé sur ce sujet) . Les commentaires de certaines personnes me font dire qu'elles n'ont pas compris ce qu'elle visitait : le lieu en lui-même n'est pas important mais c'est l'histoire qui s'y ai passé qui est mise en valeur. Ce camp d'internement a un caractère particulier dans l'histoire des camps d'internement puisqu'y ont été internés des artistes allemands et autrichiens ayant fui le régime nazi. C'est le seul camp de ce type. Les gens qui le visitent ont au moins appris l'existence de ces camps sous autorité des français. Le mémorial est très bien fait. Il y a beaucoup d'écrits donc on ne peut pas tout lire, il faut faire un choix. Les témoignages sont passionnants. La dernière partie est très bien faite et amène à réfléchir.
tispoon69
4/5
Visited in october 2017
Value for money
Service
Originality
super musée chargé d'histoire..... avec des volets historiques et un volet reflexif qui incite chacun à se positionner sur son rôle dans la detection de faits tels que les genocides...
vanerra
4/5
Visited in april 2017
Value for money
Service
Originality
Une visite intéressante dans ce lieu chargé en émotion qui nous rappelle l'histoire
Catherine1972
4/5
Visited in october 2017
Value for money
Service
Originality
Visite ludique,pensez à prendre un audio guide, pour avoir un visite plus complète. Un lieu qui permet de revivre une partie de l histoire de France
Kaki09
5/5
Visited in april 2017
Value for money
Service
Originality
Un véritable moment d'histoire.
Je ne saurais trop vous décrire le lieu mais je peux simplement vous dire que si vous en avez l'occasion, n'hésitez pas à pousser le portail de ce camp.
Je ressors jamais très bien de ces endroits mais je pense qu'il est nécessaire de nous rappeler ...
moucka
4/5
Visited in november 2016
Value for money
Service
Originality
C'est un lieu que j'ai découvert récemment, et dont je conseille la visite, il n'y a rien de sinistre, même si la réflexion nous ramène à cette époque terrible, le lieu est chargé d'émotion positive. La muséographie est très bien faite. Beaucoup d'illustrations et des textes bien clairs . C'est un Patrimoine dans tous les sens du terme,
Pacaurelie
2/5
Visited in september 2015
Value for money
Service
Originality
Je suis assez partagée sur ce site. D'une part je trouve l'entrée élevée pour un mémorial et ensuite je m'interroge toujours sur son but. C'est un mémorial et pourtant en sortant je ne me suis pas sentie plus proche des personnes qui ont été internées sur le site. La première partie du site propose énormément d'information sur la déportation, mais au final il y a trop d'information dans un espace restreint. Par exemple il y a des unes des journaux ce qui est une approche intéressante, mais il y en a tellement qu'il est difficile de garder intérêt jusqu'au bout et on est beaucoup trop nombreux pour pouvoir s'approcher correctement des pupitres. Au final j'ai eu l'impression d'avoir un cours sur la déportation alors que tout l'intérêt du site est qu'il s'agit d'un camp d'enfermement mais pas réservé à une utilisation allemande en vue de la déportation juive. Tout cet aspect finit pas être occulté. En revanche, j'ai apprécié la dernière partie du site qui propose des réflexions sur comment éviter de se retrouver de nouveau dans une telle situation.
En bref, je dirais que la visite de ce site n'est pas indispensable.
anna04
5/5
Value for money
Service
Originality
Incitée à m’y rendre par de nombreux amis, je suis allée visiter le Camp des Milles avec mes enfants et mon mari et je l’ai trouvé vraiment exceptionnel. Nous nous attendions seulement à une visite de bâtiments conservés du camp ; et nous avons en effet ressenti beaucoup d’émotion dans ces lieux d’internement laissés en l’état et impressionnants. Mais notre surprise a été de découvrir aussi la richesse historique de la muséographie, les peintures laissées par les internés, ou encore la partie réflexive multidisciplinaire que, à ma connaissance, on ne trouve nulle part ailleurs (pas à Schirmeck en tout cas que je connais bien). Cette partie incite à la vigilance en nous éclairant sur les comportements humains qui mènent aux crimes de masse. Nous avons eu une guide efficace, peut-être trop ouverte au dialogue pour le temps dont disposaient plusieurs autres visiteurs, répondant aux questions y compris sur l’histoire industrielle de la tuilerie. Nos enfants étaient ravis et nous avons ensuite approfondi par nous-mêmes librement certains films et panneaux qui n’avaient pas pu être présentés pendant la visite guidée.
Quant au commentaire d’olifred84, je remarque qu’il commence par des questions d’argent et finit par une allusion sur le même terrain… Il y a pourtant une partie d’accès gratuit dans le Mémorial, les prix d’entrée pour le reste sont inférieurs aux prix d’un bon cinéma, et nous avons trouvé celui de la médiation très raisonnable pour plus de deux heures passionnantes… Même la sécurité renforcée Vigipirate est vue par ce commentaire sous le même angle alors que cela veut dire surtout qu’aujourd’hui encore des extrémistes peuvent frapper un tel lieu de mémoire… Je trouve ces allusions indécentes et insultantes pour les anciens résistants et déportés qui ont ramé pendant je ne sais combien d’années pour créer enfin récemment ce Mémorial. L’auteur du commentaire a-t-il la moindre idée de ce qui est nécessaire à un tel lieu associatif pour assurer son équilibre budgétaire ? Vous avez dit « douteux »…?
En tout cas, nous y retournerons avec des amis pour profiter à nouveau d’un lieu aussi passionnant et qui suscite autant d’échanges et de réflexions. Et aussi pour soutenir ce beau site-mémorial !
olifred84
2/5
Value for money
Service
Originality
Premier contact avec la sécurité renforcée. On se dit que l'on pénètre dans un site de valeur. Cela se confirme à la caisse où l'on nous conseille fortement de prendre la visite guidée. Mais à la carte bleue ça fait en tout 66,50€ pour deux adultes et trois étudiants dont un moins de 18 ans. Le caissier avait oublié de nous dire que ça faisait 5€ de plus par personne.
Après on a une visite au pas de course où les guides (deux visites en même temps) sont obligés de donner de la voix pour se faire entendre car l'isolation est déplorable et les films continuent de passer alors qu'ils parlent.
Les explications sont généralement inutiles et il n'y a rien sur l'aspect industriel qui est pourtant le décor unique que l'on nous donne à voir et qui mériterait un minimum de précisions . En évitant la reconstitution les créateurs ont voulu jouer sur l'émotion pure mais la guide finit par nous dire que finalement les internés n'étaient pas si mal que ça dans ces lieux car pendant une période ils y ont été protégés. Un peu maladroit.
Et pour la maladresse la fin de la visite est un sommet. On nous amène à une présentation doucereuse des génocides et à une théorie unique qui veut faire de l'individu le seul responsable et donc le coupable de ces massacres. On nous serine pendant un temps un peu long ce qu'il faut faire et ne pas faire, comme à des enfants (y aurait-il un discours unique pour tous les visiteurs). Alors qu'il est évident que tous les gens présents savent déjà comment ça fonctionne.
Cette idéologie larvée et aux explications parcellaires finit de rendre l'entreprise douteuse.
Si vous avez visité le Mémorial de Shirmeck passez votre chemin, vous n'apprendrez rien et vous aurez la désagréable impression de perdre votre temps et votre argent, même si ce sujet est tabou dans ce contexte.
parsifal
4/5
Value for money
Service
Originality
Impressionnant meme s'il n' y a pas grand chose a voir
thiboy
4/5
Value for money
Service
Originality
J’ai visité le Site mémorial du Camp des Milles ce week-end-end : visite très riche et très complète.
J’ai particulièrement aimé la muséographie de la première partie qui permet de bien comprendre l’histoire du lieu. Bravo car l'atmosphère du lieu a été conservé et on peut bien sentir dans quelles conditions ces pauvres gens ont vécus !
Le wagon du souvenir à la fin de la visite est un moment très fort. Dire que c’est de là qu’ils sont partis pour ne plus revenir.
Julleon
4/5
Value for money
Service
Originality
Émouvant, instructif, bouleversant
Je ressors avec de nombreuses questions tant ce lieu pousse a la réflexion. La vidéo sur les mécanismes génocidaire devrait être diffusée dans toutes les écoles et même à la télévision.
Je pensais rester 1h et suis finalement restée 3h tant il y a de documents, de traces et de vidéo.
Je sors de cette visite bouleversée et avec l'envie d'y amener rapidement mes élèves.
ballebleue
5/5
Bizarre… nous y sommes aussi allés pendant ces Journées et il n'y avait AUCUNE indication de gratuité sur le site web. Dans la queue, quelques personnes surprises parce qu’elles croyaient que tous les sites étaient gratuits ces jours là. L’agent d’accueil leur a expliqué que le tarif réduit était appliqué à tous, qu’une partie du site et des expos était gratuite tous les jours, et aussi que la fondation gestionnaire était sans but lucratif. Eh oui ! la grande leçon c’est que c’est une simple usine qu’on a utilisé comme camp de déportation. Un regret : éclairage parfois insuffisant. Le plus important : les textes sont passionnants, et aussi les nombreux films et vidéos. Et nous avons trouvé les dortoirs poignants. Nous avons passé 4h et nous reviendrons.
sissidu13
2/5
Nous venons d'aller visiter en famille ce site pendant le week end de la journée du patrimoine. Sur le site du "Memorial" un publicité indiquant sans aucune anbiguitée que ce site etait gratuit a cette occasion. Surpriseà l'arrivée car nous avons réglé 7.5 € par personne (une erreur du site internet !!!!). Bien entendu nous, comme la totalité des gens sur place n'avons pas fait de scandale au vu du lieu visité et de son histoire. Pour parler du site en lui même... cela ressemble plus a la visite d'une ancienne usine désafecté qu'a un patrimoine historique. Beaucoup, mais alors beaucoup de lecture et tres peu de choses à voir. Vu que c'est une entreprise privée ... c'est un peu limite.

I file my review and I win Foxies

(50 characters minimum) *
Your picture must respect the maximum allowed weight of 10 MB
Value for money
Service
Originality

    * required fields

    Êtes vous sur de vouloir dépublier votre avis ?

    Oui, je suis sur

    To submit your review you must login.

    Join the community

    * required fields

    Thank you for your opinion!
    • Congratulations, your account has been successfully created and we are happy to have you as a Member!
    • Your review has been sent to our team who will validate it in the next few days.
    • You can win up to 500 Foxies by completing your profile!