Even if they are only a few fathoms from the French coast, we often tend to forget the Channel Islands, so close and so exotic at the same time. If each one has its own character, there are nevertheless some common components: the tranquility of the Normandy countryside, the irresistible marine charm of Brittany and a very British sociability. The tourist guide of the Channel Islands will first take you to Jersey, the largest of all, with its endless beaches where floats run and surfers are plentiful, but also its capital, Saint-Hélier, its warm pubs and its chic boutiques. Guernsey, although smaller and also more populated, is the beautiful city of Saint-Peter-Port in particular, and is home to the residence in which Victor Hugo spent 15 years of his life in exile. The island ofAlderney (Alderney) is a village where the endless walks along majestic a-pic, between Victorian forts and abandoned German blockhouses, often end with a seafood plaster cast sprinkled with beer with the inhabitants. Sark (Sark), with its splendid panoramas and pretty gardens, seems to have remained frozen in another millennium, just like the very small and serene Herm that man's hand has only barely scratched. A getaway to these islands, so familiar and yet so secret, will sound like a forgotten poem, a sailor's song that is both nostalgic and joyful. Sai l'beinv'nu!

When to go to Channel Islands?

When to go to the Channel Islands? Known as the "French Riviera of England", the islands enjoy an oceanic climate that allows them to have mild temperatures all year round. Thus, in summer, temperatures are around 20°C and the weather can be foggy while in winter temperatures can vary from 8 to 18°C, with high risk of rain. While the high season extends from May to September, spring is still the best time to visit the Channel Islands. Indeed, from April onwards, the sites are transformed into colourful gardens with a thousand flowers. Victor Hugo described Jersey as follows in the month of mai : " L he island is beautiful, it's like a big flower.  " Hydrangeas, azaleas, rhododendrons, camellias and magnolias bloom in gardens and fields. In well sheltered areas, Mediterranean plants such as mimosas, yuccas and palm trees can be found. However, the sea is still too cold to swim. This is the best time to take a walk and attend local festivities. Be careful, during the low season, many establishments close their doors. When to go to the Channel Islands? from May to September, with a preference for spring

How to go to Channel Islands? Our advice & tips

  • Organised trips
  • Going alone
  • Moving around

Most tourism professionals will offer you short stays on the Channel Islands including the hotel and the crossing whether it is for a weekend (2 days and 1 night), or for a longer stay including visits to several islands. This type of service is often economically interesting.

Discover our selection of travel agencies for this destination

The Channel Islands can be reached by plane. It should be noted that the price variation depends on the company borrowed but, above all, on the time required to book. To get the best rates in high season, buy your tickets six months in advance. For shorter periods, a much shorter time frame should not prevent you from getting an attractive price. The Channel Islands are also easily accessible by boat from France or England.

Alderney, Guernsey and Jersey each have a well-equipped and modern airport. Inter-island connections between these three airports are most often operated by local companies. The most popular and practical way is still the boat. Jersey and Guernsey have bus lines, and Alderney has a coastal railway. Cars (and taxis) are only tolerated in Jersey, Guernsey and Alderney. If the weather conditions allow it, prefer cycling or walking!

Prepare for your trip Channel Islands

Transportation
  • Book a ferry
  • Car Rental
  • Taxi
Accommodations
  • Find a hotel
  • Holiday rental
  • Airbnb rental
Stays
  • Tailor-made trip
Services / On site
  • Book a table
  • Activities & visits

Pictures Channel Islands

Discover Channel Islands

Practical information
When to travel?

When to go to the Channel Islands? Known as the "French Riviera of England", the islands enjoy an oceanic climate tha...
Read more about it

Weather forecast

The weather of the Channel Islands depends on its oceanic climate: there is little difference in temperature between...
Read more about it

Budget

In the Channel Islands, taxes are non-existent or very low, but as a majority of products are imported from England,...
Read more about it

Formalities

No visa required to travel to the Channel Islands. Under the dependence of the British Crown, they are not part of th...
Read more about it

Health

You do not run any particular risks when travelling to the Channel Islands, so no specific vaccinations are required....
Read more about it

How to travel by yourself?

The Channel Islands can be reached by plane. It should be noted that the price variation depends on the company borro...
Read more about it

How to get organized?

Most tourism professionals will offer you short stays on the Channel Islands including the hotel and the...
Read more about it

Getting around

Alderney, Guernsey and Jersey each have a well-equipped and modern airport. Inter-island connections between these th...
Read more about it

Featured articles Channel Islands

Sercq : la sensation d'être dans un autre monde

The Channel Islands, these five small parts of England a few fathoms from our coasts, have many attractions that will make you want to live in English time... Among them, the island of Sark (Sark in English) is a unique and unusual destination, appreciated by lovers looking for a romantic getaway. As soon as you set foot on this land, the charm begins to take effect. Here is why... An island from another time Partly governed by medieval ...

Îles Anglo-Normandes, charmantes voisines !

To be depressed, flying on a plane to distant lands is not always necessary. Just a few steps away from Normandy, Jersey, Guernsey, Herm, Sercq and Aurigny, they easily create thirst. Sublime coasts, rare tranquility, preserved fauna and flora, turquoise sea: Each one has its character, it would be very difficult not to find the tempting escape… The charm of the Breton coast, the calm of the Norman countryside and a very British way of ...