Stomach in heels? We've found the most unusual culinary specialities from all over the world for you! From grilled guinea pig to snake soup, all these dishes will surprise you but, believe it or not, they are real traditional recipes! So, are you ready to give it a try?

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The casu marzu

In Sardinian, casu marzu means "rotten cheese"... Very tempting, isn't it? This cheese, derived from pecorino sardo, is brought to a higher level of fermentation and infested by the larvae of the "cheese fly". Prohibited for sale, it nevertheless remains a very popular Sardinian specialty that is found among all fine gourmets. Be careful, to enjoy it, it is advisable to protect your eyes: larvae can jump up to 15 cm outside!

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The grilled guinea pig

If the guinea pig is a pet in Europe, it is not a pet at all in Peru, as illustrated by the famous Inca saying: "Raise guinea pigs and eat your fill". Indeed, Peruvians see it as an animal for everyday consumption in the same way as a cow or a pig. Fried or stewed, guinea pigs are often served on special occasions such as weddings or baptisms

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Frogs' legs

Cock-a-doodle-doo! One of the most unusual specialties in the world is French and it is of course the frog's legs. Along with the baguette and the beret, they are certainly one of the country's emblems! The English call the French "frogs' legs" in reference to this dish. But France is not the only country to eat frogs. In Italy, in the Milan region, but also in the United States, in Louisiana, small amphibians are part of the local cuisine

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Snake soup

Not very appetizing, the snake is nevertheless a very popular dish in China and Vietnam! You will be able to taste this meat in Taiwan in particular. You will be served the flesh in soup while the blood, venom, bile and semen are eaten in small glasses. A digestive?

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The kopi luwak

Kopi luwak is the rarest coffee in the world. Produced mainly in Indonesia and the Philippines, it is harvested from the excrement of the luwak, an Asian civet. This small animal feeds on coffee cherries from which it digests the pulp, but not the stone. It is the latter that is found in its stool and is used to produce coffee. The price per kilo of this sweet beverage exceeds €1,000. In the end, black gold may not be the one you think it is!

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Fried tarantulas

Specialities from the Skuon region of Cambodia, fried tarantulas are apparently delicious! Fries in oil and garlic then dipped in lime juice and pepper sauce, they can be enjoyed whole, even if you still prefer the head and abdomen. According to legend, the people of Skuon began cooking tarantulas during a food shortage before they became a local specialty. Today, it is the main source of income for the village because local people and tourists come in large numbers to taste these small creatures!

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The haggis

Haggis is undoubtedly one of the least appetizing European specialities! This Scottish dish is nothing more than a sheep's belly stuffed with the lungs, heart and liver of the sheep. Served with mashed potatoes, it is a typical dish and a national pride in Scotland!

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Coconut worms

Very widespread in Asia, coconut or silkworms are eaten throughout the day. Cooked in oil, they are often skewered before being sold as snacks. They are part of Asian street food in the same way as cicadas or giant locusts

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The balut

Native to Asia, the balut is very popular in the Philippines, China and Cambodia. It is an embryo of hen, duck or duck already developed but still in its egg. Boiled with vinegar and salt, it can be enjoyed as an aperitif, accompanied by a good beer! And what's more, it has aphrodisiac virtues!

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The shirako

Do you like sushi? Are you sure? Because this one's a little special... It's made of milt, the little bags of sperm secreted by the fishes. We usually use the ones from cod but it is not rare to find monkfish shirako, salmon or even fugu. Served with a dish of rice, it is a very fine dish to be tasted during a stay in Japan

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